Armoured Guardsmen: A War Diary, June 1944-April 1945, Robert Boscawen

Armoured Guardsmen: A War Diary, June 1944-April 1945, Robert Boscawen


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Armoured Guardsmen: A War Diary, June 1944-April 1945, Robert Boscawen

Armoured Guardsmen: A War Diary, June 1944-April 1945, Robert Boscawen

Robert Boscawen served with a Coldstream Guards tank troop from Normandy until suffering severe burns in April 1945. During that period he kept this diary, recording his experiences both on and away from the front. Before publishing his diaries, the same author produced a series of notes that provide historical information unavailable to him during the war, further details of an incident or of the fate of someone mentioned in the original diary.

One of the most interesting features of the diary is the way in which the tone keeps on changing. All the way through it alternates between light-hearted moments behind the lines and the more serious business of the war. As the fighting continues and losses mount the tone of the sections dealing with the fighting becomes rather darker, especially after Boscawen's original tank company was disbanded due to heavy losses.

Boscawen is a very engaging guide, and gives us a real feel for the life of an officer in a British tank unit (I doubt too many of his men disappeared on quite so many hunting trips!). His concern for his men and sadness at losses comes across very clearly, as does the excitement of a successful attack and the gloom caused by a failure. This book comes highly recommended.

Chapters
None - organised by date

Author: Robert Boscawen
Edition: Paperback
Pages: 232
Publisher: Pen & Sword Military
Year: 2010 edition, originally published in 2001, written in 1944-45.



Armoured Guardsman

Robert Boscowan. P E N & S W O R D M | L | T A R Y B O O KS ARMOURED
GUARDSMEN A WAR DIARY, JUNE 1944 - APRIL 1945 Shortly after D-Day, Bob
Boscawen, fresh from Eton, Cambridge and Sandhurst. found himself in
Normandy .

Author: Robert Boscowan

Publisher: Pen and Sword

The outbreak of World War II brought many changes to Britain's Brigade of Guards. The dress-parade units had always maintained a full combat capacity and made a relatively easy transition into a new unit, the Guards Armoured Division. The Guards landed in Normandy on D+4 and steadily fought their way across northern Europe. Robert Boscowan was a tank commander in the 1st Coldstream Guards and had four tanks shot from under him. On the fourth occasion he was badly wounded and burned, making a difficult postwar recovery. The years after the war, however, also brought both business and political success, culminating in a 23-year career in Parliament. Boscowan's account of Britain's elite at war is based on his wartime diaries.


Military career [ edit | edit source ]

Too young for military service at the outbreak of the Second World War, Boscawen went to Trinity College, Cambridge, where he read mechanical science and took the special army engineering course. In 1941, he joined the Royal Engineers. However, on 4 September 1942, he was commissioned as a second lieutenant into the 1st Battalion of the Coldstream Guards (with which members of his family had served since 1769, including his brothers George and Evelyn, who had been killed during the evacuation from Dunkirk), and his service number was 243507. Α] The battalion formed part of the 5th Guards Armoured Brigade, part of Major General Allan Adair's Guards Armoured Division, and Boscawen was sent to the cavalry wing of Sandhurst to train as a tank commander. In September 1944, after having fought in the Battle of Normandy, his battalion were among the first tanks to enter Brussels and he was awarded the Military Cross (MC) in the battle to relieve Arnhem. Β]

In April 1945, during the last month of the war, he was very seriously wounded and sustained disfiguring burns when a shell pierced his tank. He was evacuated to Archibald McIndoe's pioneering "Guinea Pig Club" plastic surgery unit at Queen Victoria Hospital in East Grinstead, Sussex, spending much of the next three years in hospital. Ώ] Β]

He is the author of Armoured Guardsmen, a book which follows the Coldstreamers through France, Belgium and Holland, in 1944/45.


Armoured Guardsmen: a War Diary, June 1944-april 1945 by Robert Boscowan (Hardcover, 2000)

The lowest-priced item in unused and unworn condition with absolutely no signs of wear. The item may be missing the original packaging (such as the original box or bag or tags) or in the original packaging but not sealed. The item may be a factory second or a new, unused item with defects or irregularities. See details for description of any imperfections.

What does this price mean?

This is the price (excluding postage) a seller has provided at which the same item, or one that is very similar to it, is being offered for sale or has been offered for sale in the recent past. The price may be the seller's own price elsewhere or another seller's price. The 'off' amount and percentage signifies the calculated difference between the seller's price for the item elsewhere and the seller's price on eBay. If you have any questions related to the pricing and/or discount offered in a particular listing, please contact the seller for that listing.


Higher formations served under [ edit | edit source ]

  • War Office Control 17 June–14 September 1941 Ώ] 15 September 1941 – 17 March 1943 Ώ] 17 March 1943 – 19 June 1944 Ώ] 19–27 June 1944 Ώ] 27 June–4 July 1944 Ώ]
  • XII Corps 4–13 July 1944 Ώ]
  • VIII Corps 13–23 July 1944 Ώ] 24–30 July 1944 Ώ]
  • VIII Corps 30 July–28 August 1944 Ώ] 28 August–12 December 1944 Ώ]
  • XII Corps 13–20 December 1944 Ώ]
  • XXX Corps 20 December 1944 – 17 January 1945 Ώ] 18–20 January 1945 Ώ]
  • XXX Corps 21 January–7 March 1945 Ώ]
  • Canadian II Corps 8–9 March 1945 Ώ]
  • XXX Corps 10 March–15 April 1945 Ώ]
  • XII Corps 16–27 April 1945 Ώ]
  • XXX Corps 28 April–11 June 1945 Ώ]

Royal Scots during WW1

Since 1815 the balance of power in Europe had been maintained by a series of treaties. In 1888 Wilhelm II was crowned ‘German Emperor and King of Prussia’ and moved from a policy of maintaining the status quo to a more aggressive position. He did not renew a treaty with Russia, aligned Germany with the declining Austro-Hungarian Empire and started to build a Navy rivalling that of Britain. These actions greatly concerned Germany’s neighbours, who quickly forged new treaties and alliances in the event of war. On 28th June 1914 Franz Ferdinand the heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne was assassinated by the Bosnian-Serb nationalist group Young Bosnia who wanted pan-Serbian independence. Franz Joseph's the Austro-Hungarian Emperor (with the backing of Germany) responded aggressively, presenting Serbia with an intentionally unacceptable ultimatum, to provoke Serbia into war. Serbia agreed to 8 of the 10 terms and on the 28th July 1914 the Austro-Hungarian Empire declared war on Serbia, producing a cascade effect across Europe. Russia bound by treaty to Serbia declared war with Austro-Hungary, Germany declared war with Russia and France declared war with Germany. Germany’s army crossed into neutral Belgium in order to reach Paris, forcing Britain to declare war with Germany (due to the Treaty of London (1839) whereby Britain agreed to defend Belgium in the event of invasion). By the 4th August 1914 Britain and much of Europe were pulled into a war which would last 1,566 days, cost 8,528,831 lives and 28,938,073 casualties or missing on both sides.

The Regiment raised a total of 35 Battalions and received 71 Battle Honours and 6 Victoria Crosses, losing 11,162 men during the course of the War.

1st Battalion
04.08.1914 Stationed in Allahabad at the outbreak of war.
16.11.19174 Returned to England and landed at Devonport, Plymouth and then moved to Winchester joining the 81st Brigade of the 27th Division.
20.12.1914 Mobilised for war and landed at Havre and engaged in various actions on the Western front including
1915
The action of St Eloi, The Second Battle of Ypres.
29.11.1915 Embarked for Salonika from Marseilles arriving 08.12.1915 and engaged in various actions against the Bulgarian Army including
1916
The capture of Karajakois, The capture of Yenikoi, The battle of Tumbitza Farm.
1917
The capture of Homondos.
1918
The capture of the Roche Noir Salient, The passage of the Vardar River and The pursuit to the Strumica valley.
30.09.1918 Ended the war in Izlis N.W. of Doiran, Bulgaria.

2nd Battalion
04.08.1914 Stationed at Plymouth as part of the 8th Brigade of the 3rd Division.
14.08.1914 Mobilised for war and landed at Boulogne and engaged in various actions on the Western front including
1914
The Battle of Mons and the subsequent retreat, The Battle of Le Cateau, The Battle of the Marne, The Battle of the Aisne, The Battles of La Bassee and Messines 1914, First Battle of Ypres.
1915
Winter Operations 1914-15, The First Attack on Bellewaarde, The Actions of Hooge, The Second Attack on Bellewaarde.
1916
The Actions of the Bluff and St Eloi Craters, The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin, The Battle of Delville Wood, The Battle of the Ancre.
1917
The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Second Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Arleux, The Third Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of the Menin Road, The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Battle of Cambrai 1917.
1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The Battle of Bapaume, The First Battle of Arras 1918, The Battle of Estaires, The Battle of Hazebrouck, The Battle of Bethune, The Battle of Albert, The Second Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of the Canal du Nord, The Battle of Cambrai 1918, The Battle of the Selle.
11.11.1918 Ended the war near Solesmes, France.

3rd (Reserve) Battalion
04.08.1914 Stationed at Glencorse, Edinburgh.
Aug 1914 Moved to Weymouth.
May 1915 Moved to Edinburgh.
End 1917 Moved to Ireland and stationed at Mullingar until the end of the war.

1/4th Battalion (Queen’s Edinburgh Rifles) Territorial Force
04.08.1914 Stationed at Forrest Hill, Edinburgh as part of the Lothian Brigade of the Coast Defences, Scottish Command (which became 156 Brigade of the 52nd Division).
24.05.1915 Mobilised for war and embarked for Gallipoli from Liverpool via Alexandria.
14.06.1915 Landed at Gallipoli.
06.07.1915 Formed composite Battalion with the 1/7th Battalion and engaged in various actions against the Turkish Army including
The Battles of Gully Ravine, Achi Baba Nullah, Krithia Nullahs, The evacuation of Helles.
08.01.1916 Evacuated from Gallipoli to Egypt due to severe casualties from combat, disease and harsh weather.
20.01.1916 Resumed identity as 1/4th Battalion and took over defences of the Suez Canal before engaging in the Palestine Campaign
Dueidar, The Battle of Romani.
1917
The First Battle of Gaza, The Second Battle of Gaza, The Third Battle of Gaza, Wadi el Hesi, Burqa, El Maghar, The capture of Junction Station, The Battle of Nabi Samweil, The Battle of Jaffa.
17.04.1918 Moved to France arriving at Marseilles and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of the Drocourt-Queant Line, The Battle of the Canal du Nord, The Final Advance in Artois.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in Herchies N.W. of Mons, Belgium.

1/5th Battalion (Queen’s Edinburgh Rifles) Territorial Force
04.08.1914 Stationed at Forrest Hill, Edinburgh as part of the Lothian Brigade of the Coast Defences, Scottish Command (which became 156 Brigade of the 52nd Division).
11.03.1915 Moved to Leamington and transferred to the 88th Brigade of the 29th Division.
20.03.1915 Mobilised for war and embarked for Gallipoli from Avonmouth via Alexandria.
25.04.1915 Landed at Gallipoli and engaged in various action against the Turkish Army including
First Battle of Krithia, the Second Battle of Krithia, the Third Battle of Krithia, the Battle of Gully Ravine, the Battle of Krithia Vineyard, the Battle of Scimitar Hill.
18.10.1915 Evacuated from Gallipoli to Egypt due to severe casualties from combat, disease and harsh weather.
07.01.1916 Moved to Egypt.
10.03.1916 Embarked for France at Port Said landing at Marseilles and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including
1916
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of the Transloy Ridges.
24.04.1916 Left the 29th Division and move to defend the Lines of Communication.
15.06.1916 Amalgamated with the 1/6th Battalion forming the 4/6th Battalion.
29.07.1916 Joined the 14th Brigade of the 32nd Division at Bethune.
1917
Operations on the Ancre, The pursuit of the German retreat to the Hindenburg Line.
1918
The First Battle of Arras, The Battle of Amiens, The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of the St Quentin Canal, The Battle of Beaurevoir, The Battle of the Sambre.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in Avesnelles near Avesnes, France.

1/6th Battalion Territorial Force
04.08.1914 Stationed at Gilmore Place, Edinburgh as part of the Lothian Brigade of the Coast Defences, Scottish Command (which became 156 Brigade of the 52nd Division). Supplied drafts to the 4th and 8th Battalions.
Aug 1915 Moved to the Selkirk and Peebles and then moved to Edinburgh.
05.09.1915 Mobilised for war and embarked for Alexandria from Devonport, Plymouth arriving 14.09.1915.
20.11.1915 – 27.02.1916 Part of the Western Frontier Force, which engaged in suppressing Arab and Berber tribes west of British-controlled Egypt. They had been agitated by German and Turkish propaganda and fuelled by German money. The tribes engaged in various hostile acts against the frontier posts but in three months the main threat had been overcome.
16.05.1916 Moved to France landing at Marseilles.
15.06.1916 Amalgamated with the 1/5th Battalion forming the 4/6th Battalion.
29.07.1916 Joined the 14th Brigade of the 32nd Division at Bethune which engaged in various actions on the Western front including
1917
Operations on the Ancre, The pursuit of the German retreat to the Hindenburg Line.
1918
The First Battle of Arras, The Battle of Amiens, The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of the St Quentin Canal, The Battle of Beaurevoir, The Battle of the Sambre.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in Avesnelles near Avesnes, France.

1/7th Battalion Territorial Force
04.08.1914 Stationed at Dalmeny Street, Leith as part of the Lothian Brigade.
24.04.1915 Transferred to the Scottish Rifles Brigade of the Lowland Division (became the 52nd Division).
24.05.1915 Mobilised for war and embarked for Gallipoli from Liverpool via Alexandria. (22.05.1915 227 Officers and men were killed and 246 injured in a train crash transferring men of A & D companies from Larbert to Liverpool, near Gretna Green.)
14.06.1915 Landed at Gallipoli
Gully Ravine, Achi Baba Nullah, Krithia Nullahs, The evacuation of Helles.
06.07.1915 Formed composite Battalion with the 1/7th Battalion.
08.01.1916 Evacuated from Gallipoli to Egypt due to severe casualties from combat, disease and harsh weather.
20.01.1916 Resumed identity as 1/4th Battalion and took over a section of the Suez Canal defences until engaged in the Palestine Campaign including
Dueidar, The Battle of Romani.
1917
The First Battle of Gaza, The Second Battle of Gaza, The Third Battle of Gaza, Wadi el Hesi, Burqa, El Maghar, The capture of Junction Station, The Battle of Nabi Samweil, The Battle of Jaffa.
17.04.1918 Moved to France arriving at Marseilles and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of the Drocourt-Queant Line, The Battle of the Canal du Nord, The Final Advance in Artois.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in Herchies N.W. of Mons, Belgium.

1/8th Battalion Territorial Force
04.08.1914 Stationed at Haddington as part of the Lothian Brigade of the Coast Defences, Scottish Command (which became 156 Brigade of the 52nd Division).
05.11.1914 Mobilised for war and landed at Havre.
11.11.1914 Transferred to the 22nd Brigade of the 7th Division at Merris which engaged in various actions on the Western front including
1915
The Battle of Neuve Chapelle, The Battle of Aubers, The Battle of Festubert, The second action of Givenchy.
19.08.1915 Transferred to the 51st Division as a Pioneer Battalion
1916
The attacks on High Wood, The Battle of the Ancre.
1917
The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Second Battle of the Scarpe, The capture and defence of Roeux, The Battle of Pilkem Ridge, The Battle of Menin Road Ridge, The tank attack, The capture of Bourlon Wood, The German counter attacks,
1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of Estaires, The Battle of Hazebrouck, The Battle of the Tardenois, The Battle of the Scarpe, The pursuit to the Selle, The Battle of the Selle.
11.11.1918 Ended the war at Estrun, north of Cambrai, France.

1/9th (Highlanders) Battalion Territorial Force
04.08.1914 Stationed at Claremont Street, Edinburgh as part of the Lothian Brigade of the Coast Defences, Scottish Command (which became 156 Brigade of the 52nd Division).
26.02.1915 Mobilised for war and landed at Havre joining the 81st Brigade of the 27th Division.
The action of St Eloi, The Second Battle of Ypres.
24.11.1915 Transferred to the 14th Brigade of the 5th Division.
01.03.1916 Transferred to the 154th Brigade of the 15th Division.
1916
German gas attacks near Hulluch, The defence of the Kink position, The Battle of Pozieres, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Le Transloy.
1917
The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Second Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Pilckem, The Battle of Langemark.
06.02.1918 Transferred to the 183rd Brigade of the 61st Division
The Battle of St Quentin, The Actions at the Somme Crossings, The Battle of Estaires,
The Battle of Hazebrouck, The Battle of Bethune.
01.06.1918 Transferred to the 46th Brigade of the 15th Division
The First Battle of Arras, The Battle of the Soissonnais, The attack on Buzancy, The Final Advance in Artois.
11.11.1918 Ended the war at Pipaix east of Tournai, Belgium.

1/10th (Cyclist) Battalion Territorial Force
04.08.1914 Stationed at Linlithglow and then moved to East Linton as part of the Coast Defences at North Berwick.
April 1918 Moved to Ireland and stationed at Claremorris, Curragh & Port Arlington.
1916 over 90% of original personnel overseas.

2/4th Battalion (Queen’s Edinburgh Rifles) Territorial Force
Sept 1914 Formed at Edinburgh.
Feb 1915 Moved to Penicuik and then Peebles.
Nov 1915 Moved to Cambusbarron and amalgamated with the 2/5th and 2/6th Battalions to form 19th Battalion and joined the 195th Brigade of the 65th Division.
Jan 1916 Became the 2/4th Battalion again.
Mar 1916 Moved to Essex and joined the 65th Division.
Jan 1917 Moved to Fermoy, Ireland.
Aug 1917 Absorbed into the Battalions of the 195th Brigade.

2/5th & 2/6th Battalion (Queen’s Edinburgh Rifles) Territorial Force
Sept 1914 2/5th formed at Edinburgh.
Mar 1915 2/6th formed at Edinburgh.
May 1915 Both moved to Peebles.
Nov 1915 Moved to Cambusbarron and amalgamated with the 2/5th and 2/6th Battalions to form 19th Battalion and joined the 195th Brigade of the 65th Division.

2/7th Battalion Territorial Force
Aug 1914 Formed at Leith.
Mar 1915 Moved to Peebles and then Larbert to join the 194th Brigade of the 65th Division.
Mar 1916 Moved to Essex.
Jan 1917 Moved to Ireland and stationed in Dublin.
Sept 1917 Moved to Curragh.
Mar 1918 Disbanded and Category A & B men transferred to the 4th (reserve) Battalion.

2/8th Battalion Territorial Force
Sept 1914 Formed at Haddington.
May 1915 Moved to Peebles and then Falkirk to join the 194th Brigade of the 65th Division and became the No. 16 Battalion.
Mar 1916 Moved to Essex.
Jan 1917 Moved to Ireland and stationed at Dublin.
Summer 1917 Disbanded and absorbed into the 194th Brigade.

2/9th (Highlanders) Battalion Territorial Force
Sept 1914 Formed at Edinburgh.
May 1915 Moved to Peebles and then Tillicoultry to join the 195th Brigade of the 65th Division and became the No. 20 Battalion.
Mar 1916 Moved to Essex.
Jan 1917 Moved to Ireland and stationed at Tralee.
July 1917 Moved to Limerick.
Mar 1918 Disbanded and absorbed into the 194th Brigade.

2/10th (Cyclist) Battalion Territorial Force
Sept 1914 Formed at Linlithglow and then moved to Bathgate.
1915 Part of the Coast Defences at Berwick & Coldingham.
June 1918 Moved to Ireland at Dundalk and became Infantry Battalion.
July 1918 Moved to Aldershot.
25.08.1918 Embarked for Russia from Newcastle arriving at Archangel and remained there until June 1919.

3/4th 3/5th 3/6th 3/7th & 3/8th Battalion Territorial Force
May – July 1915 Formed at Peebles except 3/8th which formed in Dec 1914.
Nov 1915 The 3/4th moved to Loanhead, the 3/5th moved to Galashiels, the 3/6th moved to Selkirk, the 3/7th moved to Innerleithen and the 3/8th remained at Peeble.
08.04.1916 All became Reserve Battalions and moved to Stobs Camp.
01.09.1916 Amalgamated into the 4th (Reserve) Battalion as part of the Lowland Reserve Brigade Territorial Force and moved to Catterick.
June 1917 Absorbed the 9th (Reserve) Battalion.
Nov 1917 Moved to Edinburgh and joined the Edinburgh Special Reserve Brigade.
April 1918 Moved to Haddington and then Cupar.

3/9th Battalion Territorial Force
June 1915 Formed at Peebles and then moved to Selkirk.
08.04.1916 Became the 9th (Reserve) Battalion.
May 1916 Moved to Stobs Camp.
01.09.1916 Joined the Lowland Reserve Brigade Territorial Force at Catterick.
June 1917 Absorbed into the 4th (Reserve) Battalion.

11th & 12th (Service) Battalion
Aug 1914 Formed at Edinburgh and then moved to Bordon, Aldershot as part of the First New Army (K1), joining the 27th Brigade of the 9th Division.
May 1915 Mobilised for war and landed in France and engaged in various actions on the Western front including
1915
The Battle of Loos
1916
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin, The Battle of Delville Wood, The Battle of Le Transloy.
1917
The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Second Battle of the Scarpe, The First Battle of Passchendaele, The action of Welsh Ridge.
1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The First Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of Messines, The Battle of Bailleul, The First Battle of Kemmel, The Second Battle of Kemmel, The Advance in Flanders, The Final Advance in Flanders, The Battle of Courtrai, The action of Ooteghem.
11.11.1918 Ended the war near Courtrai, Belgium.

13th (Service) Battalion
Sept 1914 Formed at Edinburgh and then moved to Aldershot as part of the Second New Army (K2), joining the 45th Brigade of the 15th Division.
Nov 1914 Moved to Bramshott, then Basingstoke and then Chisledon.
July 1915 Mobilised for war and landed in France and engaged in various actions on the Western front including
1915
The Battle of Loos
1916
German gas attacks near Hulluch, The defence of the Kink position, The Battle of Pozieres, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Le Transloy.
1917
The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Second Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Pilckem, The Battle of Langemark.
1918
The First Battle of Bapaume, The First Battle of Arras, The Battle of the Soissonnais, The attack on Buzancy, The Final Advance in Artois.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in Blicquy S.W. of Ath, Belgium.

14th (Service) Battalion
Nov 1914 Formed as a service Battalion of the Fourth New Army (K4) as part of the 102nd Brigade of the 34th Division.
10.04.1915 Became 2nd Reserve Battalion and moved to Stobs Camp.
Oct 1915 Moved to Richmond and joined the 12th Reserve Battalion.
April 1916 Moved to South Queensferry.
01.09.1916 Moved to Kirkcaldy and became the 54th Training Reserve Battalion of the 12th Reserve Brigade.

15th (Service) Battalion (1st Edinburgh)
Sept 1914 Formed by the Lord Provost and the City in Edinburgh.
1915 Moved to Troon and then Ripon and joined the 101st Brigade of the 34th Division.
10.08.1915 Taken over by the War Office and moved to Sutton Veny.
08.01.1916 Mobilised for war and landed at Havre and engaged in various actions on the Western front including
1916
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin Ridge, The Battle of Pozieres Ridge.
1917
The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Second Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Arleux, The fighting at Hargicourt (August), The Third Battles of Ypres (fighting for the Broenbeek, 13-23 October 1917).
1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The Battle of Estaires, The Battle of Bailleul, The First Battle for Kemmel Ridge.
16.05.1918 Reduced to cadre.
17.06.1918 Transferred to the 39th Division and engaged in supervising courses of instruction for American troops.
14.08.1918 Disbanded in France.

16th (Service) Battalion (2nd Edinburgh)
Dec 1914 Formed by Lieutenant-Colonel G McCrae MP in Edinburgh.
June 1915 Moved to Ripon and joined the 101st Brigade of the 34th Division.
10.08.1915 Taken over by the War Office and moved to Sutton Veny.
08.01.1916 Mobilised for war and landed at Havre and engaged in various actions on the Western front including
1916
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin Ridge, The Battle of Pozieres Ridge.
1917
The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Second Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Arleux, The fighting at Hargicourt (August), The Third Battles of Ypres (fighting for the Broenbeek, 13-23 October 1917).
1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The Battle of Estaires, The Battle of Bailleul, The First Battle for Kemmel Ridge.
16.05.1918 Reduced to cadre.
17.06.1918 Transferred to the 39th Division and engaged in supervising courses of instruction for American troops.
14.08.1918 Disbanded in France.

17th (Service) Battalion (Roseberry)
Feb 1915 Formed by Lord Rosebury and local committee in Edinburgh as a bantam Battalion.
April 1915 Moved to Glencorse and then Selkirk and Masham and joined the 106th Brigade of the 35th Division.
03.07.1915 Taken over by the war office and then moved to Chisledon.
01.02.1916 Mobilised for war and landed at Havre and engaged in various actions on the Western front including
1916
The Battle of Bazentin Ridge, The fighting for Arrow Head Copse and Maltz Horn Farm, The fighting for Falfemont Farm.
1917
The pursuit of the German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The fighting in Houthulst Forest, The Second Battle of Passchendaele.
1918
The First Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of Ypres, The Battle of Courtrai, The action of Tieghem.
11.11.1918 Ended the war west of Grammont, Belgium.

18th (Reserve) Battalion
June 1915 Formed from the depot companies of the 15th 16th & 17th Battalions in Edinburgh as a local reserve battalion.
Oct 1915 Moved to Ripon and then Dundee.
01.09.1916 Became the 77th Training Reserve Battalion of the 18th Reserve Brigade.

19th (Labour) Battalion
April 1916 Formed at Blairgowrie
April 1916 Moved to France.
April 1917 Transferred to Labour Corps (1st & 2nd Labour Companies).

1st Garrison Battalion
Aug 1915 Formed in Edinburgh and then moved to Stobs Camp.
Oct 1915 Moved to Mudros.
Feb 1916 Moved to Egypt and Cyprus until the end of the war.

2nd (Home Service) Garrison Battalion
Aug 1916 Formed at Leith and became the 1st Battalion Royal Defence Corps.


Review

"Some passages contain info appropriate for tabletop scenarios. You certainly get a UK version of the battle for France, complete with days that went right and days that went wrong. "-- "Historical Miniatures Gaming Society"

". a book that will be of great interest to military historians."-- "AMPS Indianapolis"

"If you are looking for a good account of operations from the perspective of those who were there, look no further."-- "AMPS"

About the Author

Patrick Delaforce served with 11th Armoured Division during the advance through NW Europe.

After a career in the wine trade he became a professional writer. Among his books in print with Pen and Sword are Churchill's Desert Rats in North Africa, Burma, Sicily and Italy, Wellington Le Beau and Monty's Marauders.


Military career

Too young to serve at the outbreak of the Second World War, Boscawen went to the evacuation from Dunkirk) of the Guards Armoured Division and was sent to the cavalry wing of Sandhurst to train as a tank commander. In 1944, his was among the first tanks to enter Brussels and he was awarded the Military Cross in the battle to relieve Arnhem. [3]

In April 1945, during the last month of the war, he was very seriously wounded and sustained disfiguring burns when a shell pierced his tank. He was evacuated to Archibald McIndoe's pioneering “Guinea Pig Club” plastic surgery unit at Queen Victoria Hospital in East Grinstead, Sussex, spending much of the next three years in hospital. [1] [3]

He is the author of Armoured Guardsmen, a book which follows the Coldstreamers through France, Belgium and Holland, in 1944/45.


Contents

The Guards Armoured Division was formed in May 1941 as a result of the shortage of armoured troops in England to face a German invasion. There was initially opposition to this move, as it was felt by the establishment that the height of the Guards—selected for height, amongst other criteria, as elite soldiers—would make them poor tank crew. The division originally consisted of two armoured brigades, the 5th and the 6th. These consisted of three tank regiments of Covenanter V tanks and a motor infantry battalion. A certain level of common sense was applied to these changes, with the 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards being assigned as the motor battalion, due to the presence of King's Company. This group of men were all at least 6 feet tall and were expected to struggle to fit into tanks. Uniquely the Division also kept its infantry company structure, with the tanks organised into companies and battalions, rather than squadrons and regiments. [ 5 ]

At the end of 1942, the division was split in line with all armoured divisions at this time, with one armoured brigade replaced with a brigade of lorried infantry. At this point the 6th and the 5th Guards Armoured Brigades were separated. During this period the division re-equipped with Crusader III tanks, which were again replaced with Sherman Vs by 1944.

The Guards Armoured division landed in Normandy at the end of June, and went into battle around Carpiquet Airfield soon after, with the infantry of the 32nd Brigade skirmishing with the 12th SS Hilterjugend. However this was only to last a couple of weeks before the armour arrived and the division was deployed further south to participate in Operation Goodwood.

The aim of this military maneuver has been debated many times, but whether intended as an assault or a feint, it had the effect of drawing most of the German reserves towards Caen, aiding the Cobra offensive. Originally intended as a combined attack, it was changed to an armoured assault as the British had suffered heavy infantry casualties and were struggling to find replacements. As a result the attack was changed to one largely of Armoured Divisions, as lost tanks would be easier to replace.

The Guards Armoured Division joined with the 7th and 11th Armoured Division for this attack. The aim was to strike south out of the Orne Bridgehead on the 18th July. The Guards Armoured Division was to advance south-east to capture Vimont and Argences. Prior to this attack the German defenses were to be bombed be the RAF. Unfortunately this was less effective than hoped and missed most of the dug-in defenders, both in the south of Caen and in Cagny and Emieville. All three of these areas were in the path of the Guards advance. As such the attack quickly bogged down and losses became heavy, the guards losing 60 tanks to a single battery of four Luftwaffe 88mm AA guns. In addition to this, the attack was opposed by Tiger tanks of the 503. Schwere Panzerabteilung and a counter attack by the 12 SS 'Hilterjugend'. Novel tactics had to by employed to deal with the more heavily gunned and armoured Tiger, with one being rammed by a Sherman of the Irish Guards. The next day enough progress was made to allow the Guards to reach Bourgebus Ridge and support the 7th and 11th Armoured Divisions, however German reinforcements started to arrive and the attack ground to a halt. Fighting continued until the 20th, when the gains were consolidated by infantry and the attack died off. The battle, while not a success from the operational point of view, was a battle in which the Guards acquitted themselves satisfactorily. The operation also drew off most of the German mechanised reserves, being convinced that the allies planned to breakout from Caen. This left little for reinforcements, when the Americans unleashed Operation Cobra on 25 July.

After Goodwood the Guards Armoured Division was reorganized into unofficial battlegroups. Goodwood had shown the undesirable effects of not having supporting infantry with the tanks. Consequently the two Grenadier battalions were formed into a battlegroup, with the Coldstream infantry attached to the Irish Guards Tanks and the Coldstream Guards tanks split into two groups and used to support the Irish and Welsh Guards battalions. The units were not organized in any formal way at this point, but rather by who happened to be closest at the time. This organisation was not unique to the Guards, the 11th Armoured also adapted the formation for Bluecoat, apparently on General O'Conner's orders. After this reorganisation, the Guards Armoured Division took part in Operation Bluecoat. [ 6 ]

Operation Bluecoat was launched on 30 July in support of the Americans taking part in Operation Cobra. Rather than continue to try to push past Caen where the majority of the German armour had redeployed after Goodwood, this attack switched back towards Villers-Bocage to support the Americans and to capture the road junction at Vire and the high ground at Mont Pincon. While the opposition was initially two weak infantry divisions (326. and 276.), they were well dug in, having prepared minefield and other defenses. The terrain was bocage which also slowed down the speed of the attack. Initially the Guards supported the 11th Armoured Division who were the spearhead of the attack by protecting their flank, however the took over the spearhead duties themselves on the 1st August, fighting in the bocage until the 15th August against elements of the 326th and 276th Infantry, 21st Panzer and 1,9 and 10th SS-Panzer divisions. This was to prove challenging to the Guards who complained that they "had been brought up indirect shooting at two miles, none of this fifteen yard business". The Germans ended up committing their tanks piecemeal, and as a result there was no defensive line as such. Instead common opposition would consist of a small mobile group of infantry supported by a few tanks or self propelled guns. Snipers and mortars were a particular problem in this terrain, with field modifications added to the tank to try to reduce the damage. Due to the difficulty of completely clearing the enemy from a particular area and of supplying sub-units, the attack ground to a halt on 4 August. On one occasion German tanks nearly overran a field nattery but were beaten back by the Division's self-propelled 17 pounder guns, one shooting through both walls of a barn to knock out a Panther.

On 7 August the Guards had a short break as the Germans concentrated their forces on a counter-offensive against the Americans at Mortain. On that day the Guards were given the 11th Armoured Divisions area to defend as well, freeing up the 11th Armoured. While not actually trying to launch a major advance, attacks in the local area were fierce, particularly around Chenedolle. Support from other arms was also provided, with the Welsh infantry regiment supported be Churchill tanks of the 6th Guards Tank Brigade and the Household Cavalry deploying as infantry in the line for a brief period.

On the 15th the Germans started to withdraw but were caught in the Falaise pocket, allowing the Guards to recover for a refit. Bluecoat had been a success and the combined arms of the battlegroup concept had been proven. This would be the way the Guards Armoured Division would operate from now on. The division took heavy losses in the operation, though the allies had enough replacements that they could lose six tanks for every German tank destroyed. Crew were a different matter, however, and a consequence of the operation was the removal of the Crusader AA tanks, possible due to the lack of air opposition their crews were used to man the replacement Shermans provided to the division.

The Guards were not committed to the fighting in the Falaise pocket, but instead got a chance to rest and regroup. On the 27th they were transferred to XXX corps under Lt-Gen Horrock and advanced on the Seine. Due to the near total collapse of the German Army in France they reached and crossed the river on the 29th. Here some more changes were made to the Guards organization. The use of an Armoured Reconnaissance Regiment had not proved successful, while armoured cars had prove more adapt at the role, despite the disadvantage of being more tied to the road network. Consequently the 2nd Household Cavalry were formally attached as the official division reconnaissance element. This freed up the Welsh Guard tankers for other duties, and formal battlegroups were formed. These were far more organized than the previous ad-hoc affair, with each regiment's battalions being merged to form a battlegroup. The Grenadier battlegroup consisted of the tanks of the 2nd Battalion and the Motor Infantry of the 1st Battalion, Grenadier Guards. The 1st Grenadier were a special case, as they traded in half their anti-tank guns to form extra infantry from the crews to give themselves the manpower to achieve this task. This required some rearranging of the division: although occasionally altered, the Grenadier and Irish groups formed the 5th Brigade, and the Coldstream and Welsh groups made the 32nd brigade. Machine-gun support was provided by the Grenadier Guards for the 5th brigade and the Northumberland Fusiliers in the 32nd. The heavy 4.2-inch mortars were kept at divisional level and allocated where required.

Having broken out from Normandy, the terrain change and the countryside became much more open and flowing. The advance was now generally along a road, with the lead elements and Typhoon air support brushing aside most opposition before it could delay the column. The population was grateful for their liberation the 2nd Household Cavalry, who were generally first into the town, had to keep a sharp eye on stowage and aerials on the exterior of the vehicle lest it be taken as a souvenir. In one town, only the intervention of the police prevented a scout car having its wheels removed. The population were starving, having been deprived of food by the Germans, and supplies and chocolate were dished out to the grateful population. On 3 September Brussels was liberated by the Guards Armoured Division after a high-speed run, the division advancing 75 miles in one day. The division could not rest long however, pushing further into north-east Belgium against stiffening German opposition. After gaining support from the 11th Armoured Division, the Guards reached the border with Holland, the Irish Guards under JOE Vandeleur seizing "Joe's Bridge", a bridge over the Meuse-Escault canal in a surprise assault.

The Guards Armoured Division was then withdrawn from the line to prepare for operation Market Garden. They formed the spearhead of the attacks into Holland, with the Grenadier Guards managing to seize seizing Nijmegen Bridge with the help of the US 82nd Airborne. [ 7 ] Following this they spent the winter in Holland and Germany, before being moved into Belgium as a reserve against the Battle of the Bulge. The infantry of the Welsh Guards were also replaced by the 2nd Battalion Scots Guards, due to lack of replacements. Following this the division participated in Operation Veritable, the operation to clear the Reichswald forest. Due to the weather and the Germans flooding the area, only the infantry ended up playing an active part. After this the towed batteries of the Royal Artillery anti-tank guns were converted to infantry for the lack of targets. The division then supported the push over the Rhine before breaking into Germany and fighting up towards Holland and along the German coast. Two Victoria Crosses were awarded to the division for the fighting during this period neither recipient survived the war.

After German surrender the Guards were mostly involved in mopping up operations and occupation duties. A small detachment was used to test the new Centurion universal tank, six of which had arrived in Germany, too late to be used in the conflict. Eventually the division was selected for conversion back to infantry, and held a "goodbye to armour" parade on June 9 Field-Marshal Montgomery took the final salute.


The Third Armored Division

is a World War II tank division which saw combat from June 1944 to September 1945. The 3AD was activated in April 1941 and began its training at Camp Polk, Lousiana. After training at Camp Polk and in the Mojave Desert the division was moved to Western Engalnd to finish its training. On June 24, 1945 the 3AD was deployed from Somerset, England into Northern France. The division landed at Omaha Beach and began its long campaign East and North into Germany.

(A map of that route can be seen below)

For research information please see the 3AD Archives tab at the top of this page.


Watch the video: Все еще Armored и немного Warfare.


Comments:

  1. Mejin

    Whether there are analogues?

  2. Zugor

    It seems to me you are right

  3. Farlan

    In my opinion, he is wrong. Write to me in PM.

  4. Tom

    It's just a great thought.

  5. Persius

    I can look for a link to a site that has many articles on this subject.



Write a message